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Jason Millet is an illustrator who has worked for DC Comics, Wizards of the Coast, Devil's Due Publishing, and Layne Morgan Media as well as on Choose Your Own Adventures books and over a dozen children's books in total. His clients include Disney, Absolut, Axe, Hallmark, the Chicago Bulls, Coca-Cola, and Major League Baseball.

 

 
How did you discover comic books? 
The Batman TV show was the gateway drug and, by the time I was five, I remember reading Batman comics regularly. My first issue featured an Ernie Chua/Chan cover...
 
What stood out about comics that made you want to be a part of them?
The art grabbed me. I don't think I really thought about who was drawing these stories, but I know I started making my own stapled pamphlets almost immediately.
 
What was the most valuable art "lesson" you ever learned?
CR: Contrapposto and how it enlivens a stiff figure.
 
Who are your favorite artists?
My influences amongst cartoonists are Neal Adams, John Buscema, Stan Drake, Bill Sienkiewicz, Alex Raymond, Hal Foster, Al Williamson, Mark Schultz, Adam Hughes, Alex Ross, etc. etc.
Amongst painters-- Tiepolo, Michelangelo, Sargent, Rubens, Manet, etc.
Amongst illustrators- Wyeth, Flagg, Parker, Gibson, Coll, Sundblom, Manchess, Loomis, Fuchs, Silverman and on and on...

What work do you do outside of comics?
I do illustrations for educational books (Encyclopaedia Britannica, Choose Your Own Adventure),storyboards for advertising, and illustration for card/role-playing games.

How long does it take you to do the art for a 22 page issue?
I can do full art from pencils to full color in a month and a half.


What's a typical work day like?
I start my work around 8 or 9 a.m. Break for lunch around noon , work until 6 or 7 and then get back to the drawing board from 7 or 8 until midnight (unless I have plans otherwise).

What was your all-time favorite project to work on?
The next job that presents me with the opportunity to do finished illustrations. Storyboards can be fun, but the deadline is so tight, one rarely gets the chance to do something really satisfying.